1. News & Issues
You can opt-out at any time. Please refer to our privacy policy for contact information.

The Obama Doctrine on Foreign Intervention and War

By

The Obama Doctrine on Foreign Intervention and War

President Obama with U.S. Army General David Petraeus, Commander of the International Security Assistance Force

Win McNamee/Getty Images
"Now, just as there are those who have argued against intervention in Libya, there are others who have suggested that we broaden our military mission beyond the task of protecting the Libyan people, and do whatever it takes to bring down Qaddafi and usher in a new government.

United Nations Mandate and International Support for Mission
"Of course, there is no question that Libya -– and the world –- would be better off with Qaddafi out of power. I, along with many other world leaders, have embraced that goal, and will actively pursue it through non-military means. But broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake.

"The task that I assigned our forces -– to protect the Libyan people from immediate danger, and to establish a no-fly zone -– carries with it a U.N. mandate and international support. It’s also what the Libyan opposition asked us to do. If we tried to overthrow Qaddafi by force, our coalition would splinter...

"... Let me close by addressing what this action says about the use of America’s military power, and America’s broader leadership in the world, under my presidency.

U.S. Is Called to Respond to Humanitarian Crises
As Commander-in-Chief, I have no greater responsibility than keeping this country safe. And no decision weighs on me more than when to deploy our men and women in uniform. I’ve made it clear that I will never hesitate to use our military swiftly, decisively, and unilaterally when necessary to defend our people, our homeland, our allies and our core interests...

"There will be times, though, when our safety is not directly threatened, but our interests and our values are. Sometimes, the course of history poses challenges that threaten our common humanity and our common security -– responding to natural disasters, for example; or preventing genocide and keeping the peace; ensuring regional security, and maintaining the flow of commerce.

"These may not be America’s problems alone, but they are important to us. They’re problems worth solving. And in these circumstances, we know that the United States, as the world’s most powerful nation, will often be called upon to help.

U.S. must respond as part of international community, not alone
"In such cases, we should not be afraid to act -– but the burden of action should not be America’s alone. As we have in Libya, our task is instead to mobilize the international community for collective action. Because contrary to the claims of some, American leadership is not simply a matter of going it alone and bearing all of the burden ourselves.

"Real leadership creates the conditions and coalitions for others to step up as well; to work with allies and partners so that they bear their share of the burden and pay their share of the costs; and to see that the principles of justice and human dignity are upheld by all."

SOURCE - White House website

  1. About.com
  2. News & Issues
  3. Liberal Politics
  4. War & Security
  5. The Obama Doctrine - The Obama Doctrine on War, Foreign Intervention - Obama War Doctrine

©2014 About.com. All rights reserved.